Tag Archives: popular culture

The Drug-Induced Suicide of Robin Williams Two Years Later

And the Perils of Being a Drugged-up Insomniac Celebrity

By Gary G. Kohls, MD
PPJ Gazette

55 years ago (July 2, 1961) an American literary icon, Ernest Hemingway, committed suicide at his beloved vacation retreat in Ketchum, Idaho. He had just flown to Ketchum after being discharged from a psychiatric ward at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN where he had received a series of electroconvulsive “treatments” (ECT) for a life-long depression that had started after he had experienced the horrors of World War I. In the “War To End All Wars: he had been a non-combatant ambulance driver and stretcher-bearer.

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Image Credit: Wikipedia

One of Hemingway’s wartime duties was to retrieve the mutilated bodies of living and dead humans and the body parts of the dead ones from the Italian sector of the WWI battle zone. In more modern times his MOS (military occupational specialty) might have been called Grave’s Registration, a job that – in the Vietnam War – had one of the highest incidences of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) that arose in that war’s aftermath.

Hemingway, just like many of the combat-induced PTSD victims of every war, was likely haunted for the rest of his life by the horrific images of the wounded and dead, so there was no question that he had what was later to be understood as combat-induced PTSD with depression, panic attacks, nightmares, auditory and/or visual hallucinations and insomnia.

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Uprooting the Experience of Normality

On this edition James speaks with philosopher and esotericist Neil Kramer on the relationships between empire, education, and the modern psyche. Kramer argues that the world is at an important crossroads where people increasingly question their neil-kramermisplaced faith in traditional institutions and the experiences they seek to govern. Today human beings are commensurately discovering their own power as individuals, and using this empowerment to question the collectivist ideas and attitudes fostered by today’s mass media and schooling.

Neil Kramer’s research, writing and multimedia endeavors focus on spirituality, mysticism, and metaphysics. He explores the relationship between inner development and the many social and cultural factors that influence our everyday lives. Kramer emphasizes embracing truth and confronting the negative in a journey to transform self.

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The Real Truth of the X-Files…

Or how mass media manipulates thoughts and opinions through popular culture

Kevin Scott King
TruthShock

In the spring of 1993 Tim-Berners Lee releases what we know as the World Wide Web… royalty free. For all intents and purposes this is the ‘Internet’ for most people. The introduction of the WWW creates an explosion of data and information sharing across the globe. People of like interests could easily find one another and share data… and they did, at an unprecedented level. This sharing of information is a godsend for any persons whose interest lie in obscure or hard to find subjects. This is particularly important for those who research controversial subjects, like those of a conspiratorial nature. But regardless of what subject, be it obscure or common, this new ability to find and share information easily and quickly, rapidly accelerated research. And hence was a boon for harder to research subjects, especially those in which parties are not keen on the ‘facts’ becoming common knowledge. Such as acts of gross criminality at the governmental and political level; murder, fraud, theft, false-flags… also labeled as ‘conspiracy theory’.

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