Tag Archives: media monopoly

Netflix Dumps Louis Farrakhan Documentary

Censorship is as censorship does. Multi-billion dollar video streaming company Netflix will not carry a documentary film, “My Life’s Journey Through Music,” highlighting controversial Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan’s musical virtuosity.

The film is produced by Minister’s Music Inc., and “features many award winning musical icons and legends from several different genres,” according to the company’s promotional site for the project available here.

Mainstream coverage of the present Netflix ban is devoid of reference to Farrakhan’s musicianship. The promo below indicates a polished production and numerous high-profile black musicians featured alongside Farrakhan throughout the film.

Needless to say Farrakhan is deemed controversial by major media and holds unconventional views on a variety of topics, including his condemnation of homosexuality and the “Satanic Jew,” the latter of which caused Twitter to temporarily censor him. Netflix announced the film would be available in August but has now pulled it, citing “an internal miscommunication.”

According to TheWrap,

Netflix will not stream a documentary about Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan, the company said in a statement on Tuesday.

The documentary, titled “My Life’s Journey Through Music,” was first reported to be on the list of films coming to the streaming service in August, with Farrakhan tweeting about the documentary’s addition to the service. But Netflix says this will not be the case, blaming an error for the film being included on the list.

“Due to an internal miscommunication, it appeared to be scheduled for release on Netflix, but it is not,” said a company spokesperson. “We apologize for any confusion this has caused.”

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Fixing the News: Blockchain-Powered Solutions for Media in Crisis

Editor’s Note: Does blockchain technology offer a potential solution to often misleading, censorial, and even fraudulent corporate news media that plagues the Western world? As the author notes in his conclusion, such projects may seem far-fetched at present, yet it was not that long ago that few believed Wikipedia would ever gain traction. Today’s real news and analyses are coming from citizen journalists who remain vulnerable to YouTube, Google, and social media gatekeepers. What if they were given the means to form their own “ecosystems” for news and commentary?

“Creating comprehensive community-powered marketplaces for production, distribution, and verification of news”

Kirill Bryanov
CoinTelegraph
(May 19, 2018)

In the US and around the world, quality journalism is going through difficult times. Against the backdrop of steadily declining trust in the mainstream press, systemic issues like the ever-intensifying political polarization of the media, proliferation of fake news, and asymmetric power relations between platforms and publishers, among others, stand in the way of the press striving to fulfill its crucial societal functions. The central role of the media in the society is, at least normatively, to provide the public with essential knowledge of the state of the world that would enable people to make informed choices. In a democracy, both institutional and social media are also supposed to facilitate an open arena for public discussion and deliberation where the wide array of voices and ideas are represented. However, the reality seems to be drifting away from this ideal in dramatic ways.

A longstanding critical tradition has an extensive list of claims to lay to the US media system’s structural deficiencies. Even in the pre-digital era, some scholars of communication were uneasy with the growing concentration of corporate ownership in media industries, seeing this trend as threatening the democratic process. Proponents of this intellectual current advocated for as wide a distribution of communication power as possible as a safeguard against power abuse at the hands of big corporate and state actors. The advent of digital news has seen yet another wave of similar criticisms, as it had soon become apparent that, contrary to early internet enthusiasts’ expectations, the new media ecosystem does not quite eliminate the disparities in communication power. Instead, it seemed to be reproducing the old patterns of power concentration, as well as giving rise to some new problematic trends.

Most of the contemporary media criticisms converge around one point: the digital news economy. The ad-based online business model often proves to be inadequate for sustaining certain forms of journalism that rely on specific and narrow audiences for financial backing. These forms happen to be the ones of social importance, like local news or investigative and issue reporting. Labelled the “attention economy,” the incentive system that social media news feeds have engendered rewards content that attracts eyeballs and generates clicks. Facebook and Google, which derive the bulk of their profits from selling targeted ads, have apparent reasons to stimulate as long user engagement with content as possible. Here’s where algorithmic newsfeeds come in handy, facilitating users’ selective exposure to content they will likely enjoy. Extrapolated to the political arena, this logic results in people getting locked up in ideological information bubbles, where partisan views become amplified and biases get confirmed. These bubbles also provide fertile soil for the spread of politically charged misinformation.

Aspiring media reformers have proposed multiple cures to these maladies. Among alternative models are philanthropic foundation-supported nonprofits, issue-specific donation-funded media outlets, and various forms of collaborative citizen journalism. Albeit sustainable in certain contexts, such solutions have so far failed to demonstrate flexibility and scalability needed to achieve any degree of mainstream adoption. Besides, these models mainly rely on goodwill of those people whose motivations are purely altruistic, which makes it difficult to ensure a steady flow of contributions.

A handful of blockchain-driven media startups that aspire to revolutionize the news economy are different in this important sense. They hope to not just draw in people longing for good journalism, but also provide them with economic incentives to contribute their efforts to sustaining the ecosystem for substantive news. Using the versatile incentive-building tools made available by crypto economy, combined with game-theoretic behavioral modelling and principles of decentralized governance, these projects aim at nothing less than creating comprehensive community-powered marketplaces for production, distribution, and verification of news.

A defining feature of each of these platforms is that they are all powered by the principles of the token economy. Unlike traditional fiat currencies or even a general-purpose cryptocurrency that could be used for any manner of transaction, crypto tokens are usually designed in a way that programmatically restricts the range of their uses to a certain set of roles and functions within a given system. Tokens therefore reflect the purposes and values of a certain platform, and can be used in order to align the economic interests of its individual users with the interests of the community at large. As a vehicle for transactions, such tokens are no longer a content-neutral instrument that simply enables transmission of information or value; rather, they entail the shared interests and values of those who subscribed to use them within a specific economic ecosystem.

Within the broader ecosystem of emerging blockchain-powered media startups, there is a wealth of platforms that use crypto-economic models to redefine the system of monetary exchanges between creators and consumers of information goods. The most common focus is on user-generated content and the ways in which regular folks in social media contexts are rewarded for their work: some examples include Steemit, Sapien, or Po.et, to name a few. The following review, however, focuses on a more specific set of projects, which explicitly address some problematic institutional aspects of the current news media system. As such, the projects in the list recognize the independent social value of news, and offer fixes that are designed to produce a better informed public.

More…

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Times of Israel: Jews *do* control the media

Dr. Eowyn
FellowshipoftheMinds
(April 28, 2018)

Any time someone says Jews control the news media, he/she immediately is accused of being anti-Semitic, Nazi racists.

But did you know that Jews openly admit that among themselves?

On July 1, 2012, The Times of Israel published an essay by Huffington Post blogger Elad Nehorai titled, “Jews DO Control the Media”.

Intended to be read by Jews, soon after the article began to receive the scrutiny of readers outside of its intended audience, Times of Israel replaced the author’s name with the alias “Manny Friedman,” perhaps because of Nehorai’s connection to the Chabad Lubavitch — a messianic, Jewish supremacist (Jews are an extension of God whom Gentiles are destined to serve), Orthodox Hasidic movement with a global reach. Some say the sect means to trigger a Third World War to bring on doomsday and the resultant reign of the Jewish people. President Trump’s son-in-law Jared Kushner and daughter Ivanka (who converted to Judaism) are members.

Nehorai’s biographical profile on the Huffington Post says:

Elad Nehorai is a writer living in Crown Heights, Brooklyn. Five years ago, he became a religious Jew in the Chabad Hassidic community and has since written about his experience extensively, most recently in his blog Pop Chassid. You can find him on Twitter as @PopChassid and Facebook.

Here’s a screenshot of the original article, with Elad Nehorai identified as the author (click image to enlarge):

Next, Times of Israel took down the essay and even removed it from its archives, which you can see for yourself here.

By then, however, the essay had been copied, pasted and re-published by bloggers, as well as preserved on the Internet Archive. (Sources: Under The Radar Media; What Really Happened)

Below is the article in its entirety.

Jews DO Control the Media

Manny Friedman • Times of Israel • July 1, 2012

This article was written under an assumed name.

We Jews are a funny breed. We love to brag about every Jewish actor. Sometimes we even pretend an actor is Jewish just because we like him enough that we think he deserves to be on our team. We brag about Jewish authors, Jewish politicians, Jewish directors. Every time someone mentions any movie or book or piece of art, we inevitably say something like, “Did you know that he was Jewish?” That’s just how we roll.

We’re a driven group, and not just in regards to the art world. We have, for example, AIPAC, which  was essentially constructed just to drive agenda in Washington DC. And it succeeds admirably. And we brag about it. Again, it’s just what we do.

Continue reading Times of Israel: Jews *do* control the media

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The CIA and the Media: Historical Fact #59

Editor’s Note: In August 2015 MHB published, “The CIA and the Media: 50 Historical Facts The World Needs to Know.” The present series seeks to augment this initial article with several dozen additional facts and observations on the relationship between the US intelligence community, the mass media, and public opinion.

The Central Intelligence Agency often acts to serve the strategic financial interests of transnational corporations as spycraft and corporate largess act symbiotically to conceal each other’s misdeeds. In 1979 the McGraw-Hill publishing house released Kermit Roosevelt’s, Countercoup: The Struggle for the Control of Iran. In the book former CIA officer told his exclusive story of “how intelligence agencies overthrew a left-leaning Iranian premier, Mohammad Mossadegh, in 1953 and reinstated the Shah,” former Washington Post editor and college journalism educator Ben Bagdikian explains.

“The issue was control of oil. The plot was called ‘Ajax,’ of which Roosevelt wrote: ‘The original proposal for Ajax came from the Anglo-Iranian Oil Company (AIOC) after its expulsion from Iran nine months earlier.’” Copies of Countercoup “were on sale in bookstores and reviewer copies were already in the mails when British Petroleum, successor corporation to AIOC, persuaded McGraw-Hill to recall all the books—from the stores and from reviewers.”

Ben H. Bagdikian, The Media Monopoly, Fourth Edition, Boston: Beacon Press, 1992, 39.

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Vice News = Fake News? (Video)

153News.net
Commentary on ViceNews’ recent video, “False Flag Hoaxers

(Warning: Profanity)

Editor’s Note: Vice News is a largely anti-journalistic video production company with a clear political agenda. Their most recent production borrows its title from “activist” groups openly seeking to quell free speech through intimidation, cyberstalking, and fraudulent copyright infringement claims. Some of their methods are critiqued in the video below.

Continue reading Vice News = Fake News? (Video)

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Trump Dresses Down Media Moguls, Anchors

“I’m in a room full of liars.”

Noland D. McCaskill
Politico
(
November 21, 2016)

The media figures arrived at Trump Tower on Monday afternoon for off-the-record meetings with the president-elect, who spent much of his campaign bashing the “dishonest” media — including deriding CNN as the “Clinton News Network” and repeatedly attacking the “failing” New York Times via Twitter.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PgRwfIzFcdM

According to a transition pool report, the media personalities are as follows: NBC News President Deborah Turness; MSNBC President Phil Griffin; CNN President Jeff Zucker and network anchor Wolf Blitzer; Fox News Co-Presidents Bill Shine and Jack Abernethy and Executive Vice Presidents Jay Wallace and Suzanne Scott; and CBS News anchors John Dickerson and Charlie Rose.

“@realDonaldTrump more gracious and magnanimous than I would be,” Fox News host and Trump ally Sean Hannity tweeted. “Meeting with network execs that tried hard to defeat him @CNN @NBCNews.”

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9/11 and the Zionist Question: Is Noam Chomsky a Disinfo Agent for Israel?

A Public Intellectual Outside the Protections of the Academy

The Kevin Barrett-Chomsky Dispute in Historical Perspective – Eights part of the series titled “9/11 and the Zionist Question”
Read the seventh part here.

Prof. Tony Hall
Editor In Chief, American Herald Tribune
Co-Host, False Flag Weekly News

Kevin-Barrett_dd126

Not one aspect of the officially authorized account of 9/11 has been able to withstand the test of close scrutiny by the best of the citizen investigators in the 9/11 Truth Movement. The crude vacuity of the ongoing 9/11 cover up can be seen as powerful evidence that many of our governors have much to hide about their own roles in the lies and crimes of 9/11 and in the subsequent onslaughts of state terror to which the original misrepresentations gave rise.

The persecution of Kevin Barrett in 2006 for doing his job as a conscientious Islamic Studies teacher can be seen in retrospect as telling evidence of government and media collusion in the 9/11 crime. The unfolding of this dark episode involving a devastating betrayal of academic integrity in the Wisconsin heartland of America helps expose those who have the most to lose if the real culprits of 9/11 were to be identified.

Continue reading 9/11 and the Zionist Question: Is Noam Chomsky a Disinfo Agent for Israel?

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