FBI To Step Up Monitoring of Social Media

In Wake of El Paso, Dayton Agency to “US-Based Domestic Violent Extremists, Perpetrators of Hate Crimes”

In the aftermath of the Dayton and El Paso mass shootings the Federal Bureau of Investigation will be looking to social media more and more in what it claims is a drive to prevent mass shootings before they occur.

“Authorities are looking at social media channels like 8chan in an effort to stop future mass shootings,” CBS News reports.

They said many attackers are inspired online with message boards and social media giving attackers the platform they seek.

“The attack in El Paso, Texas, underscores the continued threat posed by domestic violent extremists and perpetrators of hate crimes,” the FBI states in an August 4 press release, requesting the

American public to report to law enforcement any suspicious activity that is observed either in person or online.

“Many shooters spend almost two years planning their attack … Usually it’s a desire for some omnipotent control, even if its just momentary,” FBI agent Andres Simmons tells CBS News. “And there’s also a degree of desire for infamy and notoriety.”

The FBI’s announcement comes less than one week after Yahoo News reported on a Phoenix FBI Field Office Memo stating that those circulating “anti-government, identity-based and fringe political conspiracy theories” online are worthy of intensified law enforcement scrutiny because they “very likely motivate some domestic extremists to commit criminal, sometimes violent activity.”

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  1. Samizdat, (from Russian sam, “self,” and izdatelstvo, “publishing”), literature secretly written, copied, and circulated in the former Soviet Union and usually critical of practices of the Soviet government.

    Samizdat began appearing following Joseph Stalin’s death in 1953, largely as a revolt against official restrictions on the freedom of expression of major dissident Soviet authors. After the ouster of Nikita S. Khrushchev in 1964, samizdat publications expanded their focus beyond freedom of expression to a critique of many aspects of official Soviet policies and activities, including ideologies, culture, law, economic policy, historiography, and treatment of religions and ethnic minorities. Because of the government’s strict monopoly on presses, photocopiers, and other such devices, samizdat publications typically took the form of carbon copies of typewritten sheets and were passed by hand from reader to reader.

    The major genres of samizdat included reports of dissident activities and other news suppressed by official media, protests addressed to the regime, transcripts of political trials, analysis of socioeconomic and cultural themes, and even pornography.

    In its earliest days, samizdat was largely a product of the intelligentsia of Moscow and Leningrad. But it soon fomented analogous underground literatures throughout the constituent republics of the Soviet Union and among its many ethnic minorities.

    From its inception, the samizdat movement and its contributors were subjected to surveillance and harassment by the KGB, the secret police. The suppression worsened in the early 1970s, at the height of samizdat activity. Culminating in a show trial of Pyotr Yakir and Victor Krasin in August 1973, the government’s assault wounded the movement. But it survived, though reduced in numbers and deprived of many of its leaders.

    Samizdat began to flourish again in the mid-1980s because of Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev’s policy of glasnost (“openness”). KGB harassment virtually ceased, and as a result a variety of independent journals proliferated, though their readership remained tiny. By the late 1980s, the Soviet government had unofficially accepted samizdat, although it retained its monopoly on printing presses and other media outlets. Samizdat had almost disappeared by the early 1990s following the collapse of the Soviet Union and the emergence of media outlets that were largely independent of government control.

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